Aujourd'hui : Lexington, Kentucky
July Selected Horses of Racing Age
Demain : Fairyhouse
Derby Sale
Fairyhouse - le 16/07/2020
May Store Sale
Deauville - du 20/07/2020 au 21/07/2020
Vente d'Eté
Newmarket - le 24/07/2020
Tattersalls Ireland Goresbridge Breeze Up
Doncaster - du 28/07/2020 au 29/07/2020
Summer Store Sale

Farlow des Mottes : le cheval sorti des eaux !

01/05/2013 - Découvertes
Eleveur de Farlow des Mottes, Joël Poirier explique la très surprenante particularité des terres de son élevage à Soucelles. En effet, ces centaines voire des milliers d'hectares peuvent disparaître sous les eaux...  

It's raining, it's pouring ...

3 weeks away from the Grand Steeple Chase, and just after the Prix Ingré, last prep race won by Bel la Vie, Farlow des Mottes refines his assets. His breeders, Claudie et Joël Poirier, are based on low land which gets flooded every year.

 

 

During the winter, thousand of acres near Angers get under water due to massive floods which can last for months and go up very high. Far from being a total disaster,  this phenomenon is a blessing for breeders who enjoy richer land for their horses, just like farmers on the Nile valley.

 

Floodings are common in the Anjou region. Between October and mid-April, no less than 8 floodings were recorded this winter. This road, between Soulaires and Bourg, is shut down most winter.

 

It is all natural, no mystery !


Farlow des Mottes spent his first year, 2008, in this field, which can easily disappear under water. This is actually where les Mottes first foals were born, 40 years ago. Since, they get use to going up and down fields, trying to avoid the floods from the Loir Valley. The water goes up slowly, not like near the coasts, which lets inhabitants getting ready and organised with their paddles !

 

There is always a way to go and feed horses in paddocks !

 

When water goes away, lands are enriched with silt, a naturel fertiliser. Joël Poirier, just like many other breeders mix catle and horses. " They have 740 acres for themselves. Horses and cows do not eat the same grass, and they all find what they look for ! They look fantastic afterwards." 

 

Joël Poirier calls this field the Big River. Every winter, these 750 acres get flooded, a blessing for the land which gets lots of minerals and various natural fertilisers.

 

In Anjou, floodings are blessing and ressources. 1160 towns are concerned and authorities keep a close eye on the river banks and reinforce the dikes. 

 

 

Lion d'Angers racecourse. When the Oudon river gets over banks, most of the track gets under water.